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Luxury DefinedLUCY CARSEN

Price cut for Ottawa's most expensive condo

BY ADAM STANLEY, THE GLOBE AND MAIL     November 30, 2017

Unit 1904 at 1035 Bank St. in Ottawa is the city’s most-expensive high-rise condo listing.
  1. Unit 1904 at 1035 Bank St. in Ottawa is the city’s most-expensive high-rise condo listing.

The sellers have knocked $200,000 off the price of a condo that, at $2.45-million, currently ranks as Ottawa's most expensive high-rise home.

The two-bedroom, two-bathroom suite is located on the 19th floor of 1035 Bank St., in the heart of the capital's posh Glebe neighbourhood.

Its two balconies have unobstructed views of the TD Place field – site of last weekend's Grey Cup game – and the adjacent Rideau Canal.

The current owner bought the unit as an unfinished concrete shell and gave designer Chantelle Charette of the Ottawa-based firm Studio 853 carte blanche to design the space.
  1. The current owner bought the unit as an unfinished concrete shell and gave designer Chantelle Charette of the Ottawa-based firm Studio 853 carte blanche to design the space.

Listing agent Marilyn Wilson of Dream Properties Inc. Brokerage in Ottawa said it was originally priced at $2.65-million. The price includes all furnishings.

The current owner bought the unit as an unfinished concrete shell and gave designer Chantelle Charette of the Ottawa-based firm Studio 853 carte blanche to design the space. More than $1-million was spent decorating and furnishing the unit, including $18,000 for custom marble and bronze flooring in the foyer and another $18,000 for a rich mahogany sliding door.

The condo has unobstructed views of TD Place and the Rideau Canal.
  1. The condo has unobstructed views of TD Place and the Rideau Canal.

"They'll never be obstructed views, unlike Toronto where you'll buy something and you're not sure if another high-rise is going up next door," Ms. Wilson said.

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